Discussion: How to Embrace the Book Slump

In the past, I have written a post that looked into the many ways we can get over a book slump. However, I have also been very candid about the fact that this year has not been productive on the reading front for me. A lot of factors have contributed to the slump, and for the longest time, I was frustrated with myself for not being able to break out of this funk. However, as the months pass by, I’ve learned to not be too hard on myself. Today, I want to share the ways in which I’ve come to embrace my book slump.

Statistics Don’t Matter

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In this digital era, we have become obsessed with numbers. From the number of likes to the number of followers, and the number of books we read, we seem to have developed a habit of measuring our success by the numbers. I’ve done it plenty of times and still regularly check my stats for this site. It’s not a bad thing to do, and stats are a great way of analysing and utilising the sites optimum viewings. However, we also have to take the time to realise that statistics don’t determine your success because, at the end of the day, reading should be about the experience. I’ve only read 8 books this year, and I can tell you that I gained something from each book. No, not every book has blown me away, but that doesn’t mean I’ve not enjoyed it. So, whether you read 10 books or a 100 books in a year, in the end as long as you enjoy reading then the numbers really don’t matter.

Balance

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Let’s face it, we all have obligations in life that cannot be avoided. In an ideal world, I would happily take a day to just sit in the sun and just read. However, in reality, that is just not possible. I work two jobs at the moment and I’ve taken on a lot of additional hours lately that by the time I get home I’m so exhausted that I can’t even make the effort to pick up a book. Now, I know what you’re thinking, why don’t I just read during my lunch break or on the commute to work. Well, I can’t read on public transport as I get headaches, and at lunch, I find that by the time I start to immerse myself in the book my break has ended. The best time for me to read is when I clock off and can shut off from work. I used to agonise over the fact that I hadn’t read anything some days. However, I also need to accept the fact that I can’t do everything at once. Finding that work/life balance is hard, but at the end of the day, I know that the best thing to do is to read when I want to, whether it’s daily, or sporadic, it doesn’t matter.

Turn to other outlets

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There is a perk to book slumps because it gives you the opportunity to indulge in other interests. Since coming back from Canada, I’ve been trying to get back into my fitness routine, which is not as easy as you think it is. Usually, after supper, I’ll go for a quick walk around the block or do some pilates. It’s not much, but it’s a start. I’ve also been catching up with my TV and films because now that it’s summertime, we can get the projector out and watch all of these blockbusters on the big screen. That is usually how I unwind on the nights that I’m free and it has been a lot of fun. So, if you find yourself in a slump, turn to your other interests to fill that space.

Reading should always be fun

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I’ve covered this point already, but I think it is so important to stress the fact that reading should be fun. Yes, I am running out of books to review for the blog. Is it a worry. Not anymore. Why? Because this blog is as much about the discussion than it is about books alone. In fact, being in a slump has allowed me to take the time to explore and create new content for the blog. It is so easy to slip into that mindset of needing to read because you think you need to keep up a profile on the blog, but at the end of the day you blog for you. There is no rule that says you have to even write reviews to be a book blogger. I read because I enjoy it. I review books because I enjoy writing those posts, but I’ve learned that everything relating to books is not in conjunction with the blog and being in this slump has given me the chance to separate myself from that reading for the blog mind frame and just enjoy the journey these books take me on.

Those are the ways in which I’ve come to embrace my book slump.
How do you deal with slumps?

 

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17 thoughts on “Discussion: How to Embrace the Book Slump

    • Congrats on breaking the slump and finding your mojo again! Taking that step back is definitely needed, especially with how busy life has been lately. I just need to go with the flow and not put too much pressure on myself to get back into it.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. This is such a great post and you make so many good points. It’s so important to remember that we should enjoy reading and that numbers don’t matter, even if sometimes it’s hard. I know I, more often than not, feel like I should read more and more and more, just to be caught up with everything I want to read, with what everyone is talking about and, just, not to fall behind. But what matters isn’t really the number, you’re so right about that, it’s actually enjoying the books we get to and having fun with it overall, not putting all of this pressure on ourselves 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just don’t read when I’m in a slump. :p That seems like not very common advice in the book community, perhaps because of the pressures you mention, but it works well for me. I do have other hobbies and things I like to do, so sometimes it’s just nice to focus on those things instead of “forcing” myself to be excited about reading at a particular moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s exactly what I do. When I’m in a slump there is simply no use in making myself read in order to attempt to break it cause that would just pull me further into the slump. I’ve basically just taken a go with the flow attitude.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Fantastic post, doll! ❤️ I absolutely agree with all of this, especially that stats aren’t everything. When I first began blogging, I was so obsessed and blinded by my stats. Now, I’ve grown to be content with however many books I can read in my free time without it feeling like a chore, and satisfied by whatever number of blog posts I can write in a month!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is a brilliant post! A lot of my reading slumps have been caused by pressuring myself to read/blog and worrying about not having content etc. Then last summer I decided to just read, not worry about reviews/stats/arcs and the likes. I fell so in love with reading again, just because I took time to read for the fun of it and not for the sake of content.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This is exactly what I need. I’ve basically just taken the go with the flow approach now. It’s useless forcing myself to read cause that just puts me deeper in the slump.

      Like

  5. Wonderful discussion Lois! You have some wonderful insight here.

    “It is so easy to slip into that mindset of needing to read because you think you need to keep up a profile on the blog, but at the end of the day you blog for you.”

    This is so true!! At the end of the day, no one cares if you read 100 books in a year. AND if you are forcing yourself to read for a goal number, most likely your enjoyment of the reading experience will suffer. It isn’t worth it.

    I’ve actually had the opposite problem this year, I’ve been reading too much and not dedicating enough time to my blog. I’ve actually had to back off reading to make time for blogging & being active in the bookish community.

    Like

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